Smiling's my Favorite

officialheinzdoofenshmirtz:

behold, it is i, the evil social justice warrior, here to ruin your fun by pointing out that you’re being kind of an asshole

Boyfriends and girlfriends come and go, but this is for life!

eldrkevinprice:

if the broadway and theatre community dislikes bootlegs so much and don’t want people filming their shows they need to work on making theatre a more accessible form of media by filming shows professionally because you know they talk a lot about being a very open welcoming community but don’t do anything to make that community welcoming to people who can’t afford to see shows or people who live in rural areas and are literally unable to attend shows at all

blowjab:

listening to straight people complain about not being able to find someone to date

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nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.
His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.
Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.
"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."
Read our full appreciation here.
Image via See Colombia

nprbooks:

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America’s best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

Chilean novelist Ariel Dorfman says Marquez’s Nobel Prize acceptance speech was one of the author’s most important messages to the world.

"Garcia Marquez is speaking about all the people who are marginal to history, who have not had a voice," Dorfman says. "He gives a voice to all those who died. He gives a voice to all those who are not born yet. He gives a voice to Latin America."

Read our full appreciation here.

Image via See Colombia

sassyest:

clituorice:

Lindsay Lohan switches to the other side of the street when Tyler Oakley sneaks up on her

CHRIST

tibets:

here’s a video of me

304,213 plays

ahirukaizoku:

Jennifer Saunders (Fairy Godmother) - Holding Out for A Hero

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this is my 5th most played song on my ipod

no regrets

make me choose: anonymous and kathspierce asked Willow/Oz or Willow/Tara